Tag Archives: Gunning and Cormier

EFMF 2018 Pre-Fest Picks

Gear for #EFMF2017

Edmonton Folk Music Festival 2018 is beginning at the end of this week and here are our picks of what we can’t wait to hear this festival.

Most Anticipated Artists

Twila: Molly Tuttle

Asking this is like asking me to pick my favourite ice cream—my answer changes every few minutes, depending on everything from the rotation of the earth to what artist CKUA just played.  Being forced to decide at this very moment, I’m going to pick Molly Tuttle. She played the Uptown Folk Club’s Winterfest in 2017 and was absolutely phenomenal, so I’m looking forward to hearing her again.

Sable: Kaia Kater

A proficient banjo player and warm vocals by Kaia Kater? Yes, please. I have yet to see her play live but I am excited to hear her tunes filling up the session stages.

 

Most Anticipated Workshop

Sable: Lives of the Heart. Stage 2. Sunday,  August 12 5:45-6:55 PM.

Artists: Ferron and Her All Star Band, The Wailin’ Jennys, Russell de Carle, and John Craigie.

I have always been a fan of the Wailin’ Jennys even before I attended my first Folk Fest. I think this workshop will be packed with emotional and vocal feeling. My favourite kind of session ambiance.

Twila: True North. Stage 3. Saturday, August 11 3:05–4:15 PM.

I travel abroad a fair amount, and usually, that travel is solo. So when I’m a bit homesick, wishing to hear a Western Canadian accent and not to have to explain for the hundredth time (I exaggerate but not by much) where Edmonton is located I like to pull up my playlist with James Keelaghan and The Bros. Landreth on it. I’ve never heard Twin Bandit live, but their recordings make me hopeful that along with fabulous Dave Gunning & J.P. Cormier that this session is going to unbelievable.

Old Favourites

Twila: Breabach

The possibility of multiple bagpipes? Yes, please. I saw them play at EFMF years ago, and have gotten a number of messages (mostly along the lines of “OH MY GOODNESS HAVE YOU HEARD BREABACH??? YOU’LL LOVE THEM!”) from friends who have heard them play in the intervening years. Such enthusiasm from such a wide group of friends means that I’m looking forward to reaquainting myself with the sounds of Breabach this weekend.

Sable: Milk Carton Kids

I can’t wait to see this duo dressed in their dark, trim suits and singing into a shared microphones . Their dreamy vocals and agile guitar licks perfectly meld into a cohesive entity of sound. It’s the perfect music to listen to while staring up at the sky on Gallagher Hill.

 

See you on the hill!

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Garnet Rogers @ Northern Lights Folk Club

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Rogers reading an excerpt from Night Drive

Tonight marked the opening of Edmonton’s Northern Lights Folk Club’s 19th season, and it opened with a bang—Garnet Rogers commanded the stage for two sets (and an encore). In an unequivocal demonstration of support for live folk music, the line-up before the doors opened stretched out of the building and down the sidewalk. The show was sold out, just a few hopeful (and extremely lucky) folks got in when someone had an extra ticket because _________ friend/family member couldn’t come.*

Rogers cuts an imposing figure. He is a tall man, his voice is strong, and he selects his guitar from a rack filled with instruments possessing unique histories, which he happily shares. But the number one thing you take away from his concert has nothing to do with his height and everything to do with his stories. Whether it is through song or speech (or written down—now in the form of the book Night Drive) Rogers has an impeccable gift for telling a good story. With the song “Small Victory” he told us the tale of a mare rescued from slaughter, the very first stanza gives you a sense of Rogers’ attention to literary detail:

You’ve no business buying a mare like that
But buy her if you must
He bit the end off his cigar
And spat it in the dust
She’s old, she’s lame and barren too
She’s not worth feeding hay
But I’ll give her this, he blew smoke at me,
She was something in her day. 

Within seconds you are at that dusty horse auction buying that mare. Although the song has a melancholic air, it also conveys the hope in the title. Rogers succeeds in sharing a part of his emotional connection to his horses with his audience, and it set us up for a hilarious tale (FedEx and artificial insemination) about that mare’s offspring. Rogers’ tales read from Night Drive drew the audience in as much as his musical offerings did and he took us from being all of fourteen on a beach in Port Dover to a workshop stage on another coast line in Vancouver.

 

David Alan Eadie from their days in the Stan Rogers trio joined him on stage for the encore—beginning with a rousing sing-a-long chorus of “Michael Row Your Boat Ashore”, once again set up by a reading from Night Drive.  Seeing as I can’t even approach Rogers’ dramatic story-telling prowess, I’ll just say get the book, read it, and imagine a room filled with folkies singing along at the conclusion of Chapter 9. This is Rogers farewell tour of the West, so if you are from Edmonton and want to see Rogers play live then you are going to have to be the one to do the travelling. Check upcoming tour dates on his website,

*If this was you (or someone you know) I’d advise signing up for the Northern Lights Folk Club mailing list, HERE. They send you handy reminders so you aren’t standing outside the show in the cold hoping for a miraculous ticket to appear.

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Dave Gunning and JP Cormier are up next at the Northern Lights Folk Club on September 30th, 2017 and there are still some tickets available.