Tag Archives: Jeremiah McDade

Review: The Paperboys at the New Moon Folk Club

Imagine you are picking some of your best friends up the airport. They’ve just flown in from an international adventure and you haven’t seen them for some time. Before the car doors have been slammed the conversation is already in full-swing. They are telling you stories of shows they saw and food they ate. Once you arrive at their home they’ve convinced you that they need to stay awake in order to re-set their internal clocks so you follow them inside and the stories continue to flow. Someone apparently was on the phone on the ride from the airport and more friends quickly arrive at the door. Soon a celebration of your friends’ return is underway. Souvenirs and stories from their trip are  passed around while the atmosphere and discussion dissolve into a jet-lagged induced, hilariously loopy party.

You might ask why I’d ask you to imagine such a scenario. Well to me it is the best way to put you in the correct mindset for attempting to describe what happened when The Paperboys descended at the New Moon Folk Club. The show was a sell-out and the queue to get inside snaked up and down the lobby a few times before it continued out into the dark, snowy parking lot. Everyone was eager to hear The Paperboys who had just flown in from Dublin, as part of their 25th anniversary tour—what songs from the back catalogue would we get to hear?

IMG_3637Once The Paperboys took the stage it was time for the stories to start flowing: Geoff Kelly’s imaginary food baby? Apparently courtesy of Greggs’ Cornish pasties, and sausage rolls; St. Basil’s Cultural Center? Double the size of any of the small folk club venues they played in the UK and Ireland. Just like the imaginary scenario I described you were never sure if at one moment the band would all collapse from exhaustion. They never did succumb to their need for sleep, always keeping the energy level cranked—and they played until 11 o’clock which would be 6 am in the UK!

The atmosphere was a party and then some. I have never seen so many people dancing at an Edmonton folk club. Ever. Both sides of the stage had people out of their seats, twirling and bopping along to the constantly evolving musical selections blasting from the stage. We sang along with “California” at the top of our lungs and then The Paperboys started pulling in extra performers, Calvin Vollrath traded off fiddle duties for a song or two with Kalissa Landa, Jeremiah McDade offered some saxophone solos and Remi Noel joined in on trombone.

At the end of the night you were exhausted but invigorated. It was a fantastic night that like The Paperboys’ music itself defies all attempts to describe it…so imagine an evening of stories and songs bouncing from topic to topic seamlessly as only the best of friends can manage.

The next show at the New Moon Folk Club is the Dead South and is also sold-out, so start planning for 2018 and get your tickets early to the shows in the new year. Also new is New Moon crowd-sourcing local musicians for the First Set—if you know of a local artist who would benefit from playing the first set at a New Moon show email their information to FirstSetnmfc[at]gmail.com.

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Review: Maria Dunn Trio at Northern Lights Folk Club

Maria Dunn has a knack for story-telling. She gets to the heart of an event or memory of a person and brings that narrative alive — her grandfather in “Shoes of a Man”, the workers of the Great Western Garment (GWG) clothing factory in “Speed Up”, senior citizens living in rooming houses during the 1980s in Edmonton’s downtown in “Flora” and “Hans’ Song”, or “When I Was Young” inspired by the stories of Dorothy McDonald-Hyde of the Fort McKay First Nation.

Last night the Northern Lights Folk Club (Dunn’s self-professed “home” folk club) hosted Dunn for a sold out celebration of her latest album Gathering, which won an Edmonton Music Prize and was nominated for a Juno Award. But Dunn, joined by Shannon Johnson on fiddle and Jeremiah McDade on a vast array of musical instruments, didn’t restrict herself to selections from that album, pulling from all six of her albums and her other projects (Packingtown, On The River, The Carol Project, GWG: Piece by Piece and Troublemakers) as well. She shuffled through the stories with mastery, moving between the connection between McDonald-Hyde,  Alberta’s first elected female chief, and the Athabasca River to the labour history of Edmonton’s meatpacking North East to depression era trains. Dunn’s gift of exploring recollections and history is not limited by time or place as is evidenced by her award winning song “Malala” inspired by Canada’s most recent honourary citizen Malala Yousafzai. The song’s potent chorus:

Malala, where are you going?
I’ll walk beside you
I’ll meet you there

rang out for a final time with no musical accompaniment, just a joining of the musicians on stage and the audience’s voices, pulling the audience up into a standing ovation and heralding an encore of “God Bless Us Everyone” from The Carol Project.

Roddy Campbell of Penguin Eggs Magazine called Gathering as “essential listening” and I would argue that that description can be applied to all of Dunn’s work. Last night’s show concluded the 2016–17 Northern Lights Folk Club season, but until the fall there are still folk music events going on throughout Edmonton. PEI’s Lennie Gallant will be at Rio Terrace Church on May 19th see here for more details, and Maria Dunn has a local show earlier that week (details will be sent out to her mailing list so be sure to sign-up).