Tag Archives: LP

EFMF 2016 Photo Review

Now that the tarps are packed up, and a semblance of a sleep schedule has once again been established, here are some of our favourite photos from the weekend that was the 2016 Edmonton Folk Music Festival.

 

Suddenly Sunday

And suddenly it was Sunday.

Folkie Picks for EFMF 2016

The hill & Main stage
The hill & Main stage

Another Edmonton Folk Music Festival has arrived and we have our picks of the festival.

Most Anticipated Artists

Sable: I have always had a soft spot for close knit vocal harmonies and that is what I hear in this trio of Staves ladies.

As well, I have enjoyed watching the folktastic rise of The East Pointers comprised of Tim Chaisson, Koady Chaisson, and Jake Charron on fiddle, banjo, and guitar respectively. Who doesn’t love a good reel and jig?

Twila: Considering that as a kid that I begged my parents for flute lessons after listening to albums by the Chieftains, I’m thrilled to have the opportunity to hear Matt Molloy & John Carty with Arty McGlynn this coming weekend.

 

Most Anticipated Workshop

Sable: Influences-Saturday Stage 6 3:05-4:20 PM

Artists: Passenger, The Staves, The Tallest Man on Earth, Sarah MacDougall

There should be smooth tunes from these singer-songwriters from the UK and Sweden in this joint session. I hear the delicate hint of vocal vulnerability in these voices which I love for storytelling. Fingers crossed for some excellent melodic and harmonic collaborations that will hopefully result from this workshop.


Twila: Looking Back in Anger–Friday Stage 6 7:20–8:25 PM

Artists: John Wort Hannam and the Blue Collars, Matthew Byrne, Sarah MacDougall, The Mae Trio

Not sure about the session name – I briefly wondered if it was a reference to the David Bowie song from 1979 with the tense changed, but really why change the tense? Regardless of the session name, I am excited to see what magic this workshop cooks up. Workshops are at their best when everyone jumps in and jams together, making the whole stronger than the parts – and I’m excited to see how these musicians from all over the British Commonwealth (in case you were wondering: Hannam – Alberta/Jersey, Channel Islands; Byrne – Newfoundland; MacDougall – Yukon/Sweden; The Mae Trio – Australia) help one another tell stories with song.



 

The Return of Old Favourites

Sable: Sunday Main Stage 7-8 PM

Folk Fests are always great for new discoveries but it is always heart-warming to see old favorites return. I can’t wait to hear the soaring and emotive vocals of LP.  Her last performance at EFMF left quite an impression on me and I look forward to her Sunday mainstage time with excitement.

Twila: Saturday Stage 2 11 AM; Saturday Stage 5 4:20 PM; Sunday Stage 2 5:45 PM

Bluegrass is a MUST for Folk Fest. So the Steep Canyon Rangers return to EFMF is excellent news.

My Top 10 Musical Moments of EFMF

A lot happened over this past weekend at the Edmonton Folk Music Festival (EFMF). In no particular order, here are some of my top moments of the festival:

Pics by Twila

1. One of the Avett Brothers running out into the crowd to rock out with audience members up close.

2. David Francey’s honest and humble introductions to his songs like the perspective of teenage love in “Broken Glass.”

3. The Milk Carton Kids’ blunt inter-song banter.
E.g., Joey: “Kenneth’s daughter will be named Charlie… after the song…his child doesn’t have a due date yet… or a mother.”

4. Carolina Chocolate Drops’ ability to sing attitude-filled cover of Blu Cantrell’s “Hit Em Up Style” before leaving the stage early to jet-set to Regina.

5. Good for Grapes put out some serious energy on stage. Never before have I seen somebody rock out on accordion like Sean MacKeigan.

6. Tim Chaisson’s instrumental flexibility as he switched from guitar to fiddle in his sets.

7. The torrential thunderstorm that brought Loreena McKennitt’s set and EFMF to an epic end.

8. Shakey Graves tempo manipulation on stage.

9. In the process of getting the audience on their feet, Langhorne Slim jumped out into the crowd. He proceeded to shake off his sunglasses and hat in the heat of the jamming moment.

10. LP’s soaring “Tokyo Sunrise” vocals during the lantern parade on Gallagher Hill.

What were some of your top moments of EFMF?

LP Stuns at the Edmonton Folk Music Festival

Pics by misssable and twila

LP strides across the workshop stage with a cool sense of sureness and her ukulele in tow. Donning skinny black pants; a Rolling Stones t-shirt with the iconic red gaping mouth; and a grey blazer; she leans back comfortably, shaking out her curls that cascade upon her androgynous features. There is a touch of otherworldliness to her because she is so striking. However, as soon as LP takes a seat, a young girl walks to the front of the stage offering her a pink gerber daisy. LP casts her a wide smile and tucks the flower into the lapel of her blazer.

One would not automatically think of a ukulele as a rock instrument, but in the hands of LP, any preconceived notions of the ukulele being a breezy and juvenile toy are cast aside. The gentle flexibility in her ukulele lines and the whistling turbulence present throughout her songs is echoed in her pliable vocal melodies and vibrato use.

The beauty of LP is that she presents the unexpected. With her vocal range easily soaring in stratospheric soprano territories, she showcases the technical command of her entire vocal range. At the same time, her ethereal voice contrasts her masculine demeanor. LP unleashes every part of her being on stage. The audience cannot help but watch on, breathless, as LP ascends higher melodic lines, building tension, as she challenges the range of her voice or shiver at the ukulele strums accompanied by haunting whistle tones. The excitement lies in the fact that one can never anticipate what LP will do next.

LP’s Into the Wild EP is available for download.