Tag Archives: Rose Cousins

Review: Rose Cousins and Port Cities at the Arden Theatre

Rose Cousins knows when and how to deliver a comedic zinger. She has the perfect onstage proportions of self-deprecation, modesty, confidence, vulnerability, and authenticity when sharing her lyrical perspective on the world. These traits are woven throughout the fabric of her show. Whether she is demonstrating her Islander accent and colloquial phrases, deciding which dog each one of her band members should own, or giving a heart-felt thanks to the audience for supporting live music and allowing her to continue her career as a singer-songwriter, her genuineness shines through and you don’t feel like your city was simply another in a long line of shows.

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Rose Cousins & band

Audience emotions fluctuated between laughter and tears, while Cousins, with a smile, let us know that feelings were welcome. She is happy to assume the responsibility of providing a somber soundtrack for scenes of death in TV shows, a fact she expressed before she started into the heart-wrenching Go First. Introduced with the quip “We’ve just been through the ides of March, which is where Julius Caesar gets stabbed in the back by Brutus. This song isn’t about that, but is about getting stabbed in the back” My Friend aptly expressed the dichotomy between light and dark which was at the heart of Cousins’ performance.

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Rose Cousins

The rapport between Cousins and her band members exuded a quiet strength. Their instrumental offerings supported Cousins acoustic music-making without every over-powering her. They also played peppy transition music as she moved between her acoustic guitar and the piano, lightening the mood between songs before we were plunged into emotional depths. She warned the audience that things only get sadder when she is at the piano. She was not wrong since, in fact, her piano works were the most trance-like moments of the show. The translucent stage fog was lit like a funnel of light from the overhead spotlights. It created an intimate atmosphere for songs such as White Flag, Tender is the Man, Like Trees, and her Donoughmore encore off of her Natural Conclusion album. As much as a Cousins show can be a bit of an emotional rollercoaster, the dark and somber songs are always accompanied by a bit of hope. Leonard Cohen’s oft-quoted “there is a crack in everything … that’s how the light gets in” line, seems an appropriate description of Cousins’ show.

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Port Cities

Port Cities opened the concert with their stripped back harmonies. Cousins’ jokingly described them as “young whipper-snappers” and the trio does exude a youthfulness although they have also achieved success on the CBC Radio 2 chart and co-written songs with the likes of Donovan Woods.  Port Cities’ version of On the nights you stay home captured the darker edge of the Cape Breton phrase, while Sound of Your Voice demonstrated the complexity of the trio’s music. The opening set wasn’t their only contribution to the evening, as Cousins called them back out to act as the choir on Grace. The trio just released their first album, featuring their tight harmonies and it will be interesting to follow them wherever the future takes them.

The Arden’s eclectic schedule continues with groups like Delhi 2 Dublin, The Small Glories and John Wort Hannam please see their website for ticket details.

 

This article was co-written by Twila and Sable.

Top Picks from EFMF 2016

Twila: This week has been tough – no live banjo music serenading my daily activities, which have included packing up the tarps for another year, washing industrial amounts of both DEET and sunscreen out of my clothes,  editing a ton of festival photos and drinking black coffee like it is going out of style.

I’m not sure if the 16-18 hour days on site (Saturday and Sunday) were what did me in this year, but it has been an extra rough Folk-Over. So as we return to our previously scheduled lives, let’s take stock of what awesomeness happened at EFMF 2016.

Sable: Folk Fest is equal parts of thrilling and exhausting. I was able to bike down to the festival all four days and I didn’t have to rainproof all my electronic equipment! It was a waning on the hot Saturday afternoon with hours of intense sun but I gained momentum with my consecutive interviews on Sunday with Chloe Albert and The East Pointers.

Thank goodness for the annual tradition of Folkover Brunch with Twila and friends on the Monday following EFMF. I think it’s one of the best methods of recovery from so much musical enrichment.

Favourite Festival Moment:

Twila: At Matthew Bryne‘s concert on Saturday he described the moment that made his festival – Jason Wilber playing a songWatching Picasso” he wrote for Ron Hynes at the “Men of the Deep” workshop (it was pretty special).

It is a series of these sort of moments that touch us individually that makes up the magic that is a folk festival. My festival moment was at the “Losing Traditions” workshop on Saturday afternoon on Stage 3. In real life I’m a musicologist, who studies Western classical music, imagine my surprise and delight when Rune Tonsgaard Sørensen the violinist of Dreamers’ Circus stood up and started rocking out with some unaccompanied Bach only to be joined by Ale Carr (cittern) and Nikolaj Busk (accordion). My love of folk music was instantly combined with some of the most gorgeous Western classical music around. I was hooked, and haven’t stopped talking about them or that moment to anyone who will listen.

Imagine this being performed on the corner of a workshop stage in the middle of Gallagher park –PURE MAGIC!

 

Sable:

Nathaniel Rateliff
Nathaniel Rateliff

My favourite festival moment was dancing with the majority of my tarp mates during Nathaniel Rateliff and The Night Sweats Mainstage act on Sunday night. The four day EFMF can feel like a long haul with many hours in the sun and stepping over bubbling, muddy grass, but there is that cathartic release when you can just dance all that energy out. The hill was hopping on Sunday night. I mean, how can you stay still when a hit like this comes on?


Favourite New Discovery:

Sable:

Sarah MacDougall
Sarah MacDougall

I was a fan of Sarah MacDougall. She has this soulful warmth in her vocal tone that really resonated with me, especially in her Swedish rep. It also didn’t hurt that she had some of the best festival fashion I saw at the festival.

 

 

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Dreamers’ Circus

Twila: Unsurprisingly Dreamers’ Circus is my top fest pick. I was at all their performances this past weekend, I even re-jigged my schedule on Sunday to catch more of their music. Not only was there the J.S. Bach influence, on further listening I wonder now if I  hear shades of minimalism – Philip Glass or Terry Riley? And other composers like maybe a little Aaron Copland? Fantastic stuff.  As far as I can tell these fabulous musicians are only performing in Denmark and Japan for the foreseeable future, but I will definitely be keeping tabs on them.

 

Favourite Workshop:

Twila: “Nashville”, Stage 3, Saturday, 3 PM: Tom Russell, Mike Farris, Lera Lynn, Maura O’Connell and Karan Casey

I was waffling between the “Ancestors” workshop and this one. But the stage-wide jam of Johnny Cash’s Folsom Prison Blues put this one over the top for me. Tom Russell and Mike Farris’ interactions made this workshop all the more enjoyable.

Sable: “Desperados Waiting for a Train”, Stage 6, Friday, 6 PM: Rose Cousins, Mary Chapin Carpenter, Dar Williams, Lisa Hannigan

I am always a fan of a good workshop host and Rose Cousins led the way with the perfect balance of wit and admiration for her musical colleagues. I loved this sisterhood of  vocal power on stage. Cousins was able to round it all out with comedic banter and getting them all to think of their Olympic events which ranged from sleeping to tarp rolling.

Favourite Festival Food:

Sable: I’m so glad Curry N Hurry is back because I absolutely love eating curry that looks like it has been stewing all day in a large pan. Seriously, there is something so comforting to have large spoonfuls of bubbling curry over coconut rice, crispy samosas, and fresh nan.

Twila: Coffee from Kicking Horse Coffee, now also being served at the bottom of the Hill (my legs thank you).

*N.B. Although this is a post about festival favourites, I need to state a regret. I didn’t get to see The Steep Canyon Rangers due to scheduling conflicts. This made me incredibly sad and I live in the hope that they are back in town soon, so I can catch them then. – TB

*N.B. I am sad to say I was absent for Saturday afternoon to early evening. Folk Fest is a sacred time, but alas, when friend plans a wedding, they don’t always take a folkie’s priorities into consideration. I have serious regrets for not making the “Losing Traditions” workshop with The East Pointers, Dreamer’s Circus, and The Stepcrew. I heard there was jamming on Bach! – SC

EFMF 2016 Photo Review

Now that the tarps are packed up, and a semblance of a sleep schedule has once again been established, here are some of our favourite photos from the weekend that was the 2016 Edmonton Folk Music Festival.

 

Friday From The Hill

Friday photos from the Hill.

Top Picks Edmonton Folk Fest

Wish I Was There

Twila: The Dónal Lunny and Andy Irvine concert. It would have been fabulous to have seen these musicians more than I got to at EFMF 2014.

Sable: The Inside the Covers sessions looked pretty interesting with two Mainstage acts, Hudson Taylor and Phosphorescent singing cover tunes in addition to Holly Williams. I love a good covers session.

New Discovery

Twila: Parsonsfield. What I heard of them was fantastic, and I’m loving the EP that I picked up. Hopefully I will get to see them again in the near future.

Sable: Bear’s Den. Their full voiced harmonies and poignant yet simple lyrics had a raw confidence to them that made me a big fan.

Favorite Workshop

Twila: The best laid plans…you know the story. I had planned on going to Sunday’s ‘Let’s Talk About It In The Morning’ -I did research on the performers and everything. But I was waylaid by Stage 5’s ‘Hymns and Laments’ and was I ever thankful that I was drawn to this workshop full of Canadian favourites James Keelaghan, Rose CousinsRuth Moody and, John Mann. The integration of performances and the respect & admiration that was on the stage radiated out into the audience. The spirit of cooperation was easily heard as Cousins and Moody blended their voices beautifully. I’m not sure there was a dry eye in the place after Keelaghan sang McConnville’s or perhaps maybe the most memorable moment was the laughter and heads bobbing along in agreement when Mann sang his instructions for his wife on the event of his death “It’s not a sign, it’s just the wind…‘.

Sable:

The Heroes session was my favorite with 100 Mile House, Elephant Revival, Gregory Alan Isakov, and John Mann. It was the perfect session with music that balanced the surroundings. The rain had just finished falling around 6 PM on the hill and people were drying off in the cool air at the start of the workshop. There was a beautiful moment when the sun began to peek through the clouds as 100 Mile House were singing Better, Still. Elephant Revival is always excellent in workshop sessions because of the number of instruments you can call upon for a solo. Plus, you know Bonnie can always improv a washboard percussion in any piece.

 

Our good times are all gone

Blue Rodeo led the Hill in a sing-a-long of Ian Tyson’s ‘Four Strong Winds‘ to close out the 35th annual Edmonton Folk Music Festival, and the end of our Folk on the Road circuit. Bittersweet for sure, and I’ll be singing along to Four Strong Winds looped on repeat for the next week or so. Here are some pics from last day… ‘Our good times are all gone, and I’m bound for moving on. I’ll look for you if I’m ever back this way.’